Quick Write-up On How I Refinished My Jaguar Rear Tables For My Lexus 2Gs

Discussion in 'Interior' started by 2GSonAir, Apr 26, 2011.

  1. 2GSonAir

    2GSonAir New Member

    These tables are from a 1995 Jaguar XJ6 Vanden Plas Sedan. I bought them about 2 years ago from a Jaguar dismantler on the east coast. Can't remember the name of the place though. I just did a search on google and called around.
    So I finally made some time to refinish these Jag rear tables. They didn't match the wood in my 2000 Gs400 and they were cracked from being in the sun for years at the bone yard. Here's how they looked when I got them. These are pictures from the Jaguar the junkyard people sent me. Cracks all over and they were brown and didn't match at all. I paid about $180 from what I remember. They were hard for me to find at the time for some reason.

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    A LOT of time and effort was put into these tables. Took about a week and a half to finally get them mounted in.
    The Lowes guys told me to use Jasco paint stripper to remove the clear glaze that was on there. It was a major FAIL and waist of time and money. The paint stripper did not even penetrate one bit and was left on for an hour. So I scratched that plan and started with 80 grit sand paper on a handheld mouse sander and sanded until the clear was down to wood. It took about 3 hours on each one. I sanded until I was all the way down to the original wood. There is a burlwood effect that is somehow acheived from the manufacture that is not actual wood before you get down to the real wood. To keep the burlwood look then be real carefull as you sand down. Once you see dark sanding dust, you need to stop. The burlwood looks like a bunch little swirls. I didn't like it so I sanded it down to the actual wood that has more straight lines in the grain like the stock wood pieces have.
    After that I changed the sand paper to 220 grit. Sanded real lightly and then finished with 320 grit lightly.
    Then I stained them 3 times to get the color dark enough to match the stock. Here's a picture after they've been sanded and stained.

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    The stain I used was from Lowe's and in Mandarin Orange color.
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    I then made some custom holders and drip trays because the clear glaze has to be poured on. You can use a brush-on type epoxy but to acheive a thick coat just like how the tables came, my only solution was a pour-on type that auto levels. The trays were made of particle board I had around the house and the stems that go up are made of paint stir sticks I got for free at Lowes. Two paint stir sticks on each stem that were glued together then sanded down to fit exactly perfect in the slots where the brackets go. I used a nail gun to put together the drip trays and wood glued the edges so that the glaze wouldn't seep through the cracks.
    I used my compressor to blow any dust that may be on the tables. The glaze was then poured on. The instructions will tell you that there will be tiny little bubbles created from mixing and stirring the glaze. Use a small handheld propane torch to pop the bubbles. Wave the flame about 6-8 inches away from the wood back and forth and you'll see them pop. This is a real fast process. Most of the bubbles will surface and pop on their own but it says that if you do not use a torch, some will stay and create divets. Once bubbles are torched real fast, put the tables somewhere there will be no dust that circulates in the air and let dry for 3 days. I put the tables in my Honda Civic track car and rolled up the windows. The tables were put on the floor of the car lined by news paper just in case.

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    The glaze I used was bought from Lowe's as well. I glazed one table at a time. The glaze is a two part mixture of hardener and epoxy. I only mixed half of what was given at a time in a clean red solo cup hahaaa. This stuff starts to dry and gets real thick after 20 minutes so you don't have much time to play around with it so it's best to do one table at a time.

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    After they dried. I still noticed some pitting I believe is from the wood breathing and so bubbles came up and left pits. I wasn't happy so I bought another glaze kit from Lowes and poured on another coat and let dry for another 3 days. After that, the finish came out great. The only thing I need to do now is sand them down again with 2 or 3000 grit to get the slight waviness out and clear glaze them again with a brush-on type epoxy to get them perfect. Oh and also get the bottom leather reupolstered to match the existing leather. The leather color is off a bit. Shouldn't cost too much either.

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    I hope this DIY can help someone. I'm sure there's a better way but this is how I decided to do mine. Maybe some can chime in on how I can finish them and remove the slight waves. Enjoy.:thumbup:
     
  2. slvrstrk

    slvrstrk New Member

    Great job!!! Any pics on how these were mounted?
     
  3. RajahCasti

    RajahCasti New Member

    this is just what i needed thanks.:biggthumpup: Why didnt you keep the top wood part?
     
  4. 2GSonAir

    2GSonAir New Member

    I took the backing off the seats. Two 10mm bolts from the bottom and the whole panel comes off. I bought screws and nuts from Lowes, drilled holes and on the back side used big 1 1/2 inch washers. They are fully secure and don't bobble around at all. Real solid. When I find time to take them off again, I'll take pictures. I wasn't planning on doing a write up.

    They didn't fit properly. The curvature was different on my car than the Jag.
     
  5. Kouki Monster

    Kouki Monster New Member

    very nice work!
     
  6. Naguapoak

    Naguapoak New Member

    That looks great. Looking to do this next.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  7. RajahCasti

    RajahCasti New Member

    is there such thing as burlwood woodstain that you may have seen at lowes?
     
  8. 2GSonAir

    2GSonAir New Member

    Not that I know of. When I was sanding and got to the burl wood layer, it sanded right off as if it was painted on if that makes any sence.
     
  9. The burl is the grain of the actual wood. You could have someone faux it with an airbrush, but it would be much cheaper to actually use a veneer.

    I really appreciate this thread. I've had a set of rear tables, along with the center console. The tables were just as haggard as yours. I've been very skeptical of refinishing them.
     
  10. C8V6C

    C8V6C New Member

    Very nice job! I might wanna refinish mine one day
     
  11. a_tov29

    a_tov29 New Member

    looks great but just one question wouldn't it have been possible to sand down the curvature of the top piece to match or is it not solid wood
     
  12. elpresidente

    elpresidente Administrator

    I have no idea why your tables did that. People on the jag forums get them refinished all the time and they look identical to the before pics, just minus the cracks, scratches, haze, or whatever the case may be. That's odd.
     
  13. lowvanu2

    lowvanu2 Member

    These tables, are finished with lacquer, and can really be a pain in the ass! Also, they are made up of multiple pieces of wood pressed together. When mine were dipped, they tended to pop apart and had to be re-glued. As far as using the top pieces go, my solution was to trim the back piece that came from the Jaguar, and mount it inside the seats so as to use the original mounting hardware.....

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  14. RajahCasti

    RajahCasti New Member

    where can you get them refinished at?
     
  15. lowvanu2

    lowvanu2 Member

    There's a place that does hydro-printing in Phoenix...
     
  16. z168

    z168 New Member

    Awesome writeup. That gives me an idea....

    How did you color match it? Did you bring a sample of the wood you wanted?
     
  17. 2GSonAir

    2GSonAir New Member

    I brought the stock wood piece from my door.
     

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