How to install Sound Deadener - Make your car quiet like a Tomb!

Discussion in 'Tutorials and How-To's' started by berlinas2k2, Jun 20, 2010.

  1. berlinas2k2

    berlinas2k2 New Member

    DIY Sound Deadening - Make your car quiet like a tomb!

    This is probably one of the easiest things you guys & gals can do to your car to make it quite inside, almost quiet enough to hear a pin drop. The Odyssey is by far one of the most noisy cars I have ever owned. All the road noise, wind noise and engine noise filters and echoes in the cabin due to poor designs and baffling by the factory. This DIY will show you how to take your car from economy to Luxury.

    Time: 1-3 hours per door (depending on how many layers you do. I wouldn't do more than 3 max)

    Tools: Razor blades or Exacto knife, shop paper towels, degreaser/cleaner, plastic scraper (not metal it will scratch) & Heat gun *optional* - You can use Dynamat, FatMat, RattleMat, Luxury Liner etc.

    1. Start by removing the door panel plastic. *remove interior door handle cup screw, pull out door handle cup, slide off door lock lever from cup, remove screws in door handle pull, pop all clips holding door panel to door frame, remove power connectors from door courtesy light and window switch, lift off door panel*

    2. Carefully pull away all the plastic sheeting that covers the door skin shown below.

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    Should look like this when done.
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    3. Using a Plastic or Wood scraper, I used a plastic trim panel tool, carefully scrape away all of the silicone. *note, do not use a metal scraper, you will scratch the metal and allow rust to form later on*

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    4. Once all the silicone is removed, clean the entire door skin surface with degreaser / cleaner. Do not use paint thinner. Any oils left on the metal will not allow the sound deadener to stick to the panel.

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    5. Next, using hose loom, cover the door lock rods. This is important because if you skip this step, your door locks will likely not operate once you cover them with sound deadener.

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    6. Once the lines are covered, you can start cutting and laying mat. Cut the mat to the desired shape and peel away the wax paper to reveal the adhesive side. When applying try not to cover any wiring as if you ever need to remove the door you won't have to cut up the good sound mat you applied earlier. Use a wooden roller to firmly adhere the mat to the door skin. Be sure there are NO air pockets.

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    7. If you want the most out of this stuff, I would recommend doing 1 layer of mat on the inside of the door shell (on the outer skin), and 2-3 layers on the door frame as shown. The main point is to cover all of the cut-outs in the door skin as they allow the sound waves to vibrate and "echo" into the cabin.
    *Here is my door panel finished with 1 layer on the inside and 2 layers on the outside. = 3 layers total. This is about 14sq. feet of mat (per door)

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  2. OG

    OG Active Member

    dampers do not make your car quiet, they are used to reduce panel resonance. covering the openings of the doors is intended to create a sealed enclosure so that the speaker can perform better.

    to reduce noise you need an acoustic barrier, something that actually blocks sound waves from entering the car. mass loaded vinyl is the weapon of choice.

    decoupling is the last piece of the puzzle. closed cell foam can be used to pad panels, stopping rattles, as well as spacing noise barriers from dampers.

    application of the damper is spot on but you're far from done and have only addressed 1 issue.
     
  3. lowvanu2

    lowvanu2 Member

    In either case, good advice from both, do tell, so that I may relieve myself of the inevitable sorrow that will ensue from what this process will cost me.....
     
  4. berlinas2k2

    berlinas2k2 New Member

    I already have the foam barrier underneath all the carpeting. I will do the backs of the panels once I reinstall them.
     
  5. donpisto

    donpisto Member

    I never thought about the wire loom. Good info here.

    A cheap way out for certain areas (like pillars, quarter panels, and possibly the trunk lid) is to use expanding foam. Helps a whole damn lot.

    If you want to reduce road noise, the floor is another important piece but a less expensive way to target that (just not as much) is to use liquid deadener on the wheel wells. Also use sound deadening on the fenders. Rubberized undercoating works too but I'm not sure how long it will hold up, but that stuff is super cheap.
     

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