Cinnnnnaammmmoooonnnn!!!!!

Discussion in 'Interior' started by polobai, May 6, 2011.

  1. polobai

    polobai Member

    I have a 97 Lexus LS400 Coach edition that is tastefully modded (in my opinion)-but I was not feeling the tan interior. The interior was too tan, and hard to maintain/keep clean. I always liked the way the e46 BMW M3 Cinnamon interiors looked against the black, so I decided this would be the way I went. I am a serious DIY'er and figured this would be another perfect project! My plans were to convert most of the interior to Cinnamon/black, and leave parts tan as the car just has too much tan in it from the factory to convert it all (seatbelts, etc.) I have already dyed the seats once the factory tan color using Leatherique products (www.leatherique.com) and was impressed by the outcome. This time I figured I would go all out and do a complete re-dye of the tan and perform a color change. This will document my process and how it came out in the end. This is what I started with:
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    The rear with JP accessories:
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  2. polobai

    polobai Member

    So here it goes, first off is to remove the seats from the car and begin the prep work. I warn you now-if you plan on doing a full re-dye, give yourself at least a month to get it done without killing yourself. My project took two, but I took my time and didnt stress it too much as this is not my only mode of transportation. Im sure you guys know how to pull seats and door panels, so I will not bore you with that. Here is the drivers seat after much prep. To prep the seat, I used the leatherique prepping agent (ALOT) and wetsanded the seat using 400 grit sandpaper. Yes, you need to sand the original dye off your leather to ensure the color change sticks! I must admit that it was scary sanding my leather as it was in pretty good shape and I hate to mess up a good thing-but it was worth it. Spend your time prepping-your results will show it if you do not. You need to take off about 60-75% of the original dye off the leather, keep plenty of rags handy to wipe the surface clean, and make sure you dont sand the leather down to suede. It may not look like much of the original color is out of the seat-but trust me it is. Once its dry it looks more tan than it is, when wet you can barley tell it was tan to begin with! You will know when the dye is breaking up-it will start to show a dark color and smooth feel to it.

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    1 person likes this.
  3. brainneeded

    brainneeded Active Member

    interesting. i'm always apprehensive when people decide to DIY a color change with dye, but i've seen it pulled off enough to know it's doable. in for progress pics!
     
  4. polobai

    polobai Member

    Here are some of the parts I am dying black

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    These will be wrapped in black suede by yours truly :)

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  5. polobai

    polobai Member

    Here are the back seats

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  6. polobai

    polobai Member

    And door panel inserts/armrest

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  7. polobai

    polobai Member

    Now onto the fun part-how to apply the dye. In the past I used a "wipe dye" technique (see leatheriques site for how its done)-but found that it left swirls. This time I wanted to spray the dye on, so off to Harbor Freight I went and purchased a High Volume/Low Pressure detail gun. This way the application of the dye should be much smoother in the end.
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  8. polobai

    polobai Member

    I also purchased an air regulator. This was very important, as the gun operates at low pressures-I set the gun to 35psi and it was too much at first, eventually I found the sweet spot at around 25 psi of pressure.

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  9. polobai

    polobai Member

    Now comes the fun part-spraying on the dye! I started with the rear armrest as this would be tough to get to with it closed :) The dye dries within 5 mins to the touch, i found 3 coats were necessary to achieve full color. Spray light, even coats-this stuff WILL RUN if you spray it on to thick, so be careful! (I practiced on the back of the rear headrest and it ran! I found the correct pressure before doing the back seat. If it runs, wait till it dries, sand it off and spray again.)
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  10. SFL_Y33

    SFL_Y33 New Member

    x2
     
  11. polobai

    polobai Member

    Here is the inside of the armrest (top and bottom)
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  12. polobai

    polobai Member

    I want to say this is the first or second coat on the back seats

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  13. polobai

    polobai Member

    Second coat on the door panel inserts and armrest
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  14. polobai

    polobai Member

    Third coat on the rears
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  15. polobai

    polobai Member

    last for the armrest and door panel inserts
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  16. polobai

    polobai Member

    Final coat on the rear seats
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  17. polobai

    polobai Member

    First coat on the front seats
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  18. polobai

    polobai Member

    A few coats later (5 total on the front-dont want any chance of them rubbing off)
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  19. polobai

    polobai Member

    back seat done
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  20. polobai

    polobai Member

    rear bench done
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